Climate Change in the Upper Dolores - Trout or Drought
Oct
17
6:30pm 6:30pm

Climate Change in the Upper Dolores - Trout or Drought

Where: Room 130 in Noble Hall, Fort Lewis College, Durango CO

Join Trout Unlimited and Mountain Studies Institue for a presentation and conversation about potential climate change impacts on trout habitat and populations in the Dolores River. Partners from both organizations will present findings from a recent coldwater-fisheries adaptive management framework and answer questions from stakeholders.

Contact page@mountainstudies.org with questions. 

View Event →
Connecting for Conservation: mini-workshop
Nov
1
9:00am 9:00am

Connecting for Conservation: mini-workshop

Join us November 1 for a mini-workshop that builds upon the success of the original C4C to offer opportunities for the growth and improvement of existing partnerships, and encourage a broader dialogue about the greatest potential and impact of collaborative conservation efforts. This mini-workshop will lay the groundwork for a larger, more in-depth workshop next spring (2018). 

View Event →
Bioclimate Mapping Workshop - NEW date
Nov
2
8:00am 8:00am

Bioclimate Mapping Workshop - NEW date

Where:  Durango Rec. Center, Durango, CO 81301

Join us for presentations on Bioclimate models and change projections to inform forest adaptation in Southwestern Colorado.  Forest adaptation strategies can help reduce anticipated impacts of climate change and increase the likelihood of maintaining forest cover into the future.  Bioclimate models provide spatially explicit projections of impacts to tree species that can be used to guide adaptation at landscape and project scales. 

Contact Priscilla@mountainstudies.org or 970-387-5161 with questions

 Please register at Bioclimate Workshop

jpg bioclimate flyer.jpg
View Event →

Discovery Center Open House
Jul
11
5:30pm 5:30pm

Discovery Center Open House

Mountain Studies Institute invites the community to an open house celebrating the new Mountain Discovery Center! This family friendly event will feature fun activities, light refreshments, and the opportunity to check out the Discovery Center’s exhibits. MSI staff will be on hand to answer questions about the hydrology and natural history of the San Juan Mountains. Tuesday, July 11th from 5:30 - 7:30 pm at the Mountain Discovery Center, 114 East 12th Street. Learn more about the Mountain Discovery Center here.

View Event →
Forests to Faucets Teacher Workshop: My Water Comes from the San Juan Mountains
Jun
27
to Jun 28

Forests to Faucets Teacher Workshop: My Water Comes from the San Juan Mountains

  • Pagosa Springs, Colorado (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

A two-day workshop for teachers who want to learn watershed science and the model lessons using the My Water Comes from the San Juan Mountains teacher guide, children's book, and kit. Learn more at our webpage.

Contact amanda@mountainstudies.org with questions. Hope to see you there!

View Event →
San Juan Mining and Reclamation Conference in Ouray, CO
May
23
to May 24

San Juan Mining and Reclamation Conference in Ouray, CO

This year's San Juan Mining Conference will take place in Ouray, CO on May 25th - May 26th. The theme will be address Measuring Success, Innovation, and the Future.  The conference is currently soliciting abstracts for presentations, posters, & roundtable discussions; Deadline is March 15th. More information:  www.mountainstudies.org/sjmrc

View Event →
Wildfire Movie Night
May
4
6:30pm 6:30pm

Wildfire Movie Night

Wildfire Season is here. Is Pagosa Springs prepared? Join representatives of the Colorado State Forest Service, FireWise of Southwest Colorado, San Juan Headwaters Forest Health partnership, and the United States Forest Service at the Liberty Movie Theatre in Pagosa Springs for a Movie Night and panel discussion all about wildfire.

This evening will include short films from across the country, conversation, and door prizes. Come learn, have fun, and discuss how we can make Pagosa Springs more prepared. The evening is sponsored by the National Fire Protection Association and State Farm as part of Wildfire Awareness Week.

 

 

View Event →
Mountain Studies Mixer-Meet the Silverton Staff!
Apr
6
5:30pm 5:30pm

Mountain Studies Mixer-Meet the Silverton Staff!

Join Mountain Studies Institute for a fun and informal mixer at the home of board member Judith Graham. This will be a great opportunity to learn about upcoming MSI initiatives and get to know the three talented staff members that are based out of our Silverton office: Anthony Culpepper, Jeremy May and Lisa Branner. Thursday April 6th, 5:30 - 7:30 pm at 1045 Snowden Street in Silverton. Light refreshments will be served. 

View Event →
Engaging Stakeholders in Developing Adaptation Strategies
Mar
22
12:00pm12:00pm

Engaging Stakeholders in Developing Adaptation Strategies

FREE WEBINAR!  

Part of the Social-Ecological Resilience and Changing Landscapes series.

Follow the link to learn how to participate in the webinar.

Presented by Marcie Bidwell (Mountain Studies Institute) and Betsy Neely (The Nature Conservancy) More description to follow

Please join us next week for the fifth webinar in The Social-Ecological Resilience and Changing Landscapes Webinar Series. This series explores activities and tools that facilitate effective adaptation and build social-ecological resilience in the context of changing landscapes. For additional information, visit the series website  or contact Laurie Yung at the University of Montana W.A. Franke College of Forestry and Conservation. The full webinar series schedule is also attached.  

Next week’s webinar (Wednesday, March 22nd,  Noon-1:00 PM(MST)) will focus on Engaging Stakeholders in Developing Adaptation Strategies.  Adapting to a changing world is a complex social-ecological problem that no single organization, agency or individual can solve in isolation. This webinar will focus on techniques for engaging stakeholders in adaptation planning. Drawing on work in Southwest Colorado, the webinar will describe processes that bring scientists, land managers, and stakeholders together to identify strategies to reduce the negative impacts of climate change.  This webinar will be presented by Marcie Bidwell (Mountain Studies Institute) and Betsy Neely (The Nature Conservancy).   

This webinar series is sponsored by the U.S. Forest Service Rocky Mountain Research Station, North Central Climate Science Center, University of Montana W.A. Franke College of Forestry and Conservation, United States Geological Survey, The Nature Conservancy, Mountain Studies Institute, Colorado Natural Heritage Program, Western Water Assessment, University of Colorado, and NOAA.   

View Event →
ARC Forum
Mar
20
2:30pm 2:30pm

ARC Forum

Presentation Topic: Rory Cowie, MSI's Water Resource Program Director will speak on Surface and Groundwater Interactions in mining impacted mountain watersheds

This presentation is part of the Animas River Community Forum meeting series, which is free and open to the public. Dr. Cowie will speak on Surface and Groundwater interactions and how the mines are impacting water quality in the Animas River. He will share insights from three different mine investigations to illustrate modern methods to explore hydrologic connections in the San Juan Mountain mining districts. Dr. Cowie is a hydrologist and program director for water research at MSI and is currently contracted by the EPA to conduct hydrologic investigations in the Bonita Peak Mining District.

View Event →
Community Driven Forest Restoration for Warm-Dry Mixed Conifer Forests in the San Juan Mountains
Mar
14
6:30pm 6:30pm

Community Driven Forest Restoration for Warm-Dry Mixed Conifer Forests in the San Juan Mountains

  • Fort Lewis College, Center for Southwest Studies (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Ecologist Anthony Culpepper will present "The Natural History and Stakeholder-Driven Approach to Forest Health of Warm-dry Mixed Conifer Forests of the San Juans."  Anthony will discuss the forest health issues currently facing these forest types; changes in fire ecology; insect outbreaks; possible community changes due to climate change; and increased human interface.  He will then use the San Juan Headwaters Forest Health Partnership (SJHFHP) as a case study of a stakeholder group focusing on the restoration and management of warm-dry mixed conifer forests near Pagosa Springs.  He will conclude with an overview of monitoring activity and subsequent findings conducted by the Mountain Studies Institute to assess the effectiveness of stakeholder-driven management activities.

Location: Fort Lewis College, Center for Southwest Studies, Lyceum

View Event →
WEBINAR SERIES: Social-Ecological Resilience and Changing Landscapes
Mar
8
to Apr 5

WEBINAR SERIES: Social-Ecological Resilience and Changing Landscapes

Join us during Spring 2017 to explore activities and tools that facilitate effective adaptation and build social-ecological resilience in the context of changing landscapes. For additional information, visit the series website or contact Laurie Yung (laurie.yung@umontana.edu) at the University of Montana W.A. Franke College of Forestry and Conservation . All webinars are Wednesdays Noon-1:00 pm (Mountain Time) and are completely FREE and open to the public!

Log-in to the webinar through AdobeConnect at https://usfs.adobeconnect.com/sac. You will be prompted to download a plug-in the first time you access AdobeConnect. There is no password for the webinar meeting room. Audio for the webinar is available through the conference line 1-888-844-9904, passcode 2453228#.

This webinar series is sponsored by the U.S. Forest Service Rocky Mountain Research Station, North Central Climate Science Center, University of Montana W.A. Franke College of Forestry and Conservation, United States Geological Survey, The Nature Conservancy, Mountain Studies Institute, Colorado Natural Heritage Program, Western Water Assessment, University of Colorado, and NOAA.


View Event →
Feb
22
12:00pm12:00pm

Understanding the Views of Decision-Makers

FREE WEBINAR!  

Part of the Social-Ecological Resilience and Changing Landscapes series.

Follow this link to learn how to participate in the webinar.

Presented by: Laurie Yung (University of Montana) and Katie Clifford (University of Colorado)

Next week’s webinar (Wednesday, February 22nd, Noon-1:00 PM (MST)) will focus on Understanding the Views of Decision-Makers on Climate Adaptation.  Effective adaptation at the landscape-scale requires action on the part of a range of decision-makers, from agency staff to local ranchers and tourism operators.  This webinar will describe social science tools that can be employed to better understand what decision-makers think about projected climate impacts and the opportunities and challenges that they face with regard to adaptation.  As an example, we will discuss how we used landscape-scale climate scenarios in Southwest Colorado to engage decision-makers in thinking about potential responses to climate change, variability and uncertainty, barriers to effective adaptation, and engaging the public.  In addition, the webinar will examine how to identify decision-makers in different contexts and what can be learned from different methods.  This webinar will be presented by Laurie Yung (University of Montana), Katie Clifford (University of Colorado, Boulder), and Carina Wyborn (Luc Hoffmann Institute). 

View Event →
Feb
8
12:00pm12:00pm

Webinar: Developing Scenarios for the Landscape-Scale

FREE WEBINAR!  

Part of the Social-Ecological Resilience and Changing Landscapes series.

Follow this link to learn how to participate in the webinar.

  • Presented by Imtiaz Rangwala (Western Water Assessment) and Renee Rondeau (Colorado Natural Heritage Program)

Next week’s webinar (Wednesday, February 8th, Noon-1:00 PM (MST)) will focus on Developing Scenarios for the Landscape Scale. Scenarios are increasingly used to help decision-makers think about projected changes and how to make decisions under uncertainty. The webinar will outline a process for developing landscape-scale scenarios, building on an example from southwestern Colorado. Presenters will explain how they selected three model projections to represent a range of plausible hydroclimatic futures for 2035. They will then describe how to choose decision-relevant climate attributes and focus in on specific ecological impacts. Finally, they will talk about how to translate this information into narrative scenarios that are accessible to the public and utilize communication strategies that make projected changes relevant and tangible, including the use of historical benchmark events (e.g. a recent drought) and climate analogues (e.g. in 2035 town A will have a climate similar to the current climate of town B). This webinar will be presented by Imtiaz Rangwala (Climate Scientist, Western Water Assessment and NOAA) and Renee Rondeau (Conservation Planning Team Lead, Colorado Natural Heritage Program). 

This webinar series is sponsored by the U.S. Forest Service Rocky Mountain Research Station, North Central Climate Science Center, University of Montana W.A. Franke College of Forestry and Conservation, United States Geological Survey, The Nature Conservancy, Mountain Studies Institute, Colorado Natural Heritage Program, Western Water Assessment, University of Colorado, and NOAA.    

 

 

View Event →
Feb
6
7:00pm 7:00pm

Nile Project Panel: "Music, Citizen Engagement and Water Resource Management"

Time - 7:00-8:00 PM 

Location - Fort Lewis College Community Concert Hall

Theme: Human life depends on the availability and quality of water to sustain our health, grow our food, power our homes with electricity, and stimulate our economies. However, due to overpopulation, increased demand for food, climate change andpollution, as much as two thirds of the worlds citizens may face water stressed conditions severely impacting the living and economic conditions of communities, countries, and regions by 2025. Without water, we cannot survive. How can we, as individuals, become more involved in the management of this precious and limited resource?

Format:

We will begin with 2-3 minute introductions, ending with Mr. Girgis, who will give some background about the Nile Project.

The primary question is: How can we, as individuals, become more involved in the management of this precious and limited resource?

We will follow with: How does the Nile water region parallel or diverge from the water stresses in Durango and the Four Corners?

We will then allow the conversation to head in the direction it naturally moves. The panel will last from 60 to 90 minutes.

Nile Project background

Using music to spark cultural curiosity, the Nile Project engages audiences to learn about the world’s longest river and understand its largescale social, cultural, and environmental sustainability challenges. The Collective’s collaborative model offers a blueprint for new ways Nile citizens can organize themselves to make the Nile more sustainable. In an evolving series of interlocking programs that spring from the concert experience, the project hopes to inspire, educate and empower young people worldwide to contribute to Nile sustainability.

From its debut concert, captured live on the 2013 release entitled ASWAN, it was clear that the Nile Project was something completely new. National Public Radio named the recording one of five “Must Hear International Albums.” Fast forward a few years — through tours in Africa, Europe, the US and UAE — and almost all major media outlets agree that the Nile Project is much more than just a band. The New York Times described it as “a committed, euphoric international coalition.” Afropop Worldwide calls it “seductive and beautiful […] nothing short of revolutionary.”

More information can be found HERE

 

View Event →